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Category: Sacral dimple

Sacral dimple

Medically reviewed by Drugs. Last updated on Sep 13, A sacral dimple is an indentation, present at birth, in the skin on the lower back.

It's usually located just above the crease between the buttocks. Most sacral dimples are harmless and don't require any treatment. Sacral dimples that are accompanied by a nearby tuft of hair, skin tag or certain types of skin discoloration are sometimes associated with a serious underlying abnormality of the spine or spinal cord. In these instances, your child's doctor may recommend an imaging test. If an abnormality is discovered, treatment depends on the underlying cause. A sacral dimple consists of an indentation, or "pit," in the skin on the lower back, just above the crease between the buttocks.

A sacral dimple is an indentation in the skin on the lower back — usually just above the crease between the buttocks. Most sacral dimples are small and shallow. A sacral dimple is a congenital condition, meaning it's present at birth. There are no known causes.

Ask Dr. Burke: Sacral Dimples

Rarely, sacral dimples are associated with a serious underlying abnormality of the spine or spinal cord. Examples include:. The risks of these spinal problems increase if the sacral dimple is accompanied by a nearby tuft of hair, skin tag or certain types of skin discoloration.

Sacral dimples are present at birth and are evident during an infant's initial physical exam. In most cases, further testing is unnecessary. If the dimple is very large or is accompanied by a nearby tuft of hair, skin tag or certain types of skin discoloration, your doctor may suggest imaging tests to rule out spinal cord problems.

In general, your child won't need to see a doctor for a sacral dimple. If you have questions about the sacral dimple, you can also bring these up at your child's routine office visits. All rights reserved. Terms of use. The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records.A sacral dimple is a small indentation dent in the lower back, near the crease of the buttocks.

It is a congenital condition, meaning it is there when the baby is born. Most sacral dimples do not cause any health issues. In some cases, a sacral dimple can be a sign of an underlying spinal problem. These issues are usually minor. Sometimes they can include conditions such as spina bifida or a tethered spinal cord. Spina bifida happens when the spine does not form totally in a fetus.

A tethered spinal cord is one in which the spinal cord nerves grow attached to a spot on the spine.

Sacral Dimple: Diagnosis and Tests

This limits the ability of the spine to move. Based on its size and location, the doctor may order additional tests to rule out spine problems. Sacral dimples do not have any symptoms other than the indentation itself. The dimple is typically shallow and found in or near the crease of the buttocks.

In rare instances, some sacral dimples are a sign of a spine or spinal cord problems. In these cases, your doctor might refer you for further evaluation. A sacral dimple that is a sign of an accompanying spinal problem may have signs including:. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services.

Sacral Dimple A sacral dimple is a small dent in the lower back of a baby near its buttocks.

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The congenital condition is only rarely associated with a more serious spinal cord or spine problem. Sacral Dimple What is a sacral dimple? How common are sacral dimples?

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Roughly 3 to 8 percent of babies are born with a sacral dimple. What causes a sacral dimple? Doctors do not know why sacral dimples appear in some people at birth. What are the symptoms of a sacral dimple?

A sacral dimple that is a sign of an accompanying spinal problem may have signs including: Tuft of hair nearby Skin tag small bit of extra skin Bruising or discoloration of nearby skin Next: Diagnosis and Tests Share Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Print.

sacral dimple

Show More.A sacral dimple is located very close to the sacrum. However, some may be a sign of disease. They are common in newborn babies. An indentation, present at birth in the skin on the lower back, is called a sacral dimple. It is also known as pilonidal dimples, or sacrococcygeal or coccygeal dimples or pits. They are the most common anomaly detected during neonatal spinal examinations. In the majority of cases, they are a normal part of a healthy body.

Usually, they are located above the crease between your buttocks. Most are harmless and do not need any treatment; if the dimple is small or shallow, it is harmless.

Sometimes, sacral dimples are a sign of birth defects involving the spinal cord or bones, hence, doctors pay close attention to sacral dimples. One such common birth defect is spina bifida occulta, which usually does not cause problems. In some cases, they indicate problems with the kidneys. The abnormalities or problems are detected by the pediatrician or by an obstetrician who delivers the child. With a few medical tests, these conditions can be ruled out. Sacral dimples that have a tuft of hair, certain types of skin discoloration, or a skin tag are often a sign of an underlying abnormality of the spine; you may need an imaging test for this and your physician will give you treatment based on its cause.

There may be certain appearances like swelling in the area, a birthmark, skin tagsor patch of hair. These appearances may trigger concern about accompanying birth defects. Normally, the dimples are less than 5mm in the midline and less than 25mm from the anus. However, if a dimple is greater than 5mm deep and large or located more than 25mm from the anal margin, it could be related to occult spinal dysraphism.

The presence of lumbosacral lipomas, hairy patches, skin tags, or vascular lesions increases the risk of occult spinal dysraphism.Ultrasound is the most commonly used modality, as well as being the modality of choice in neonatal assessment. Please Note: You can also scroll through stacks with your mouse wheel or the keyboard arrow keys.

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Check for errors and try again. Thank you for updating your details. Log In. Sign Up. Log in Sign up. Articles Cases Courses Quiz. About Blog Go ad-free. On this page:. The simple sacral dimple: diagnostic yield of ultrasound in neonates. Pediatr Radiol. A cross-sectional prospective study of cutaneous lesions in newborn. ISRN Dermatol. Radiology Review Manual. Read it at Google Books - Find it at Amazon. Edit article Share article View revision history Report problem with Article.

URL of Article. Article information. Systems: MusculoskeletalSpinePaediatrics. Synonyms or Alternate Spellings: Sacral dimples. Support Radiopaedia and see fewer ads. Loading more images Close Please Note: You can also scroll through stacks with your mouse wheel or the keyboard arrow keys.

Sacral dimple

Loading Stack - 0 images remaining. By System:. Patient Cases.Sacral dimples are a common cutaneous anomaly in infants. Spine ultrasonography USG is an effective and safe screening tool for patients with a sacral dimple. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical manifestations in patients with an isolated sacral dimple and to review the management of spinal cord abnormalities identified with USG.

We reviewed clinical records and collected data on admissions for a sacral dimple from March through February that were evaluated with spine USG by a pediatric radiologist. During the same period, patients who were admitted for other complaints, but were found to have a sacral dimple were also included. This study included infants under 6-months-old males and females; mean age Thirty-one infants with a sacral dimple had an echogenic filum terminale, and 57 children had a filar cyst. Twenty-seven patients had a low-lying spinal cord, and only one patient was suspected of having a tethered cord.

Follow-up spine USG was performed in 28 patients, which showed normalization or insignificant change. In this study, all but one infant with a sacral dimple had benign imaging findings. USG can be recommended in infants with a sacral dimple for its convenience and safety.

Cutaneous lesions of the lower back region could be associated with tethered cord syndrome including hairy patches, subcutaneous lipomas, and dimples.

It is not well known whether this is associated with other spinal cord anomalies.

sacral dimple

A sacral dimple was found in 1. It has been reported that a dimple can be seen as a typical benign lesion when visible, less than 0. Large, deep, and distant from the anus, hair, and of changed color may be associated with other diseases.

Ultrasonography USG is a safe and cost-effective screening method and is commonly used in infants with sacral dimples. In addition, spinal USG performed at a young age is effective because it can acquire relatively accurate imaging compared to postossification.

Despite its many advantages, there is a suggestion that USG is not required. This study investigates the clinical features of the sacral dimple in patients with a sacral dimple, and evaluates the prevalence of accompanying diseases and the necessity of USG.

A retrospective review of clinical information and imaging findings lumbar spinal USG and spine magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] was performed for the records of children who were diagnosed with a sacral dimple from March through to February in Chungnam National University Hospital. A USG was performed for all patients who visited for a sacral dimple.

The USG findings of the patients who underwent the first US within 6 months after their birth were analyzed. Physical examination including height and weight were investigated at the first visit. The birth history including gestational age, birth weight, and delivery method were examined. The clinical features of sacral dimple were determined by examining the hair, skin color, secretion, and distance from the anus to the sacral dimple. Patients with grossly observed anal anomalies or masses, chromosomal anomalies, and multiple deformities were excluded.

The flow diagram for enrollment was as drawn in Fig. A kyphotic curvature was created by placing the patient on a small pillow in a prone position and performing a midline scan over the spinous process.

Sacral dimple

We recorded the level of the tip of the conus medullaris CMthe pulsation of CM or the nerve roots, the thickness and echogenicity of the filum terminale FTthe presence of intraspinal mass, and normal variants including filar cysts and ventriculus terminalis. The echogenicity of FT was compared to adjacent roots of the cauda equina. FT was considered thick when it measured more than 2 mm on transverse and longitudinal US and was considered fibrous or lipomatous nature.

If the tip of the CM was below the L2—3 disc space, this was considered low-lying spinal cord. We defined the isolated low CM as the tip of CM is seen at L2—3 disc space or the L3 vertebral body level without evidence of tethering. Of the patients who underwent spinal USG, patients boys and girls who were younger than 6 months were included in the study Fig.

sacral dimple

The mean age at first visit was In birth history, the mean gestational age was One hundred ninety patients were born at full term, and 1 patient was born at 42 weeks of gestational age.A sacral dimple is an indentation, present at birth, in the skin on the lower back.

It's usually located just above the crease between the buttocks. Most sacral dimples are harmless and don't require any treatment. Sacral dimples that are accompanied by a nearby tuft of hair, skin tag or certain types of skin discoloration are sometimes associated with a serious underlying abnormality of the spine or spinal cord.

In these instances, your child's doctor may recommend an imaging test. If an abnormality is discovered, treatment depends on the underlying cause. A sacral dimple is an indentation in the skin on the lower back — usually just above the crease between the buttocks.

Most sacral dimples are small and shallow. A sacral dimple consists of an indentation, or "pit," in the skin on the lower back, just above the crease between the buttocks. A sacral dimple is a congenital condition, meaning it's present at birth. There are no known causes.

Rarely, sacral dimples are associated with a serious underlying abnormality of the spine or spinal cord. Examples include:. The risks of these spinal problems increase if the sacral dimple is accompanied by a nearby tuft of hair, skin tag or certain types of skin discoloration. Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products.

Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. This content does not have an English version. This content does not have an Arabic version. Overview A sacral dimple is an indentation, present at birth, in the skin on the lower back. Sacral dimple Open pop-up dialog box Close. Sacral dimple A sacral dimple is an indentation in the skin on the lower back — usually just above the crease between the buttocks. Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic.

Share on: Facebook Twitter. Assessment of the newborn infant. Accessed July 8, Zywicke HA, et al. Sacral dimples. Pediatrics in Review. Allan PL, et al. The infant spine. In: Clinical Ultrasound. Elsevier Limited. Philadelphia, Pa. Kucera JN, et al.

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The simple sacral dimple: Diagnostic yield of ultrasound in neonates.Sacral dimples are small clefts at the base of the spine. They are relatively common in newborn babies and do not usually indicate problems.

In rare cases, people may experience symptoms later in life. In this article, learn about the possible complications of sacral dimples. A sacral dimple is a small dimple or cleft at the base of the spinal cord.

It is found in the small of the back, near the tailbone, which is also known as the sacrum. It is a congenital condition, meaning a person is born with it.

sacral dimple

Sacral dimples are sometimes known as pilonidal dimples. Often, they will be discovered when a doctor first examines an infant. Sacral dimples are relatively common in healthy, newborn babies and do not normally signal a concern. They are seen in around percent of births, although the cause of them is unknown. In most cases, sacral dimples are simply signs of minor abnormalities as the baby grows inside the womb.

In rare cases, they can indicate a deeper spinal abnormality. A sacral dimple will appear as a small dimple or pit in the lower back. It is usually very shallow, and the bottom can be seen easily. A sacral dimple may be located in the crease between the buttocks. However, some attributes can signal further defects, and they will need to be examined with an ultrasound.

These include :. A sacral dimple can also form in children or adults. Although the exact cause is unknown, it is believed it happens when loose hairs push into the skin.

Sacral dimples that are minor and shallow usually have no complicationsand there are no known risk factors. These dimples do not require any treatment. However, deeper pits that continue inside the body can link directly to the spinal cord or the colon.

This can also cause a chronic rash. In these cases, the dimple needs to be closed. Deeper pits can often become infected, and an abscess or cyst may develop. Often this type of growth does not happen until the person is in their teens. There is no known link between the presence of a sacral dimple and spinal dysraphism or incomplete fusion of the spine or spinal cord.


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